Cheyenne C.C.

you get accustomed and the change hits, and it hurts. you  learn to live your new life and you can't even recall what it was like before. Life's a wheel and comes full circle.

ruralarchaeologist:

oosik:

casethejointfirst:

oosik:

zomganthro:

ruralarchaeologist:

If you ever wanted to know how we do winter archaeology the answer is a cement saw, some feed bags, a pick axe and lots of muscle! This was actually taken last spring so there isn’t very much snow (nor is it very cold) but you get the idea.

Canadian CRM is badass

Alaskan archaeologists opt to hibernate during the winter. Though if it’s vital, we’ll use weed burners to soften up the ground. Hats off to you, ya crazy Canadians.

Yeah but how much of the dirt that is so hard that the had to SAW IT were they able to screen??

It is possible to take the frozen sediment back to the lab for screening. CRM is all about pandering to the client (cost), yet still being able to do justice to the resource. For we archaeologists in Alaska, the problem is usually that this methodology is cost prohibitive. And, sure, with this process you could make sawdust of some artifacts, but what’s really the difference between that and jamming a shovel into the dirt hoping to miss that same artifact? A clean cut versus an ugly snap?

Hey everyone new! I’ve already discussed how we screen and process the soil on a previous reblog of this post so I’ll just copy and paste my answer again and hopefully clear up a few of the questions you all have about archaeology in the NW: It’s very different from summer archaeology, and very VERY different from academic archaeology. The point of commercial archaeology is to locate sites within a development, so that we can avoid them. We aren’t testing to learn more about a specific site. We are using the least invasive methods available (and within reason and price range) to selectively test high potential features to prove the existence of a site. We often refuse to test truly high potential features during the winter, as well. Once that is established we petition to the Archaeology Branch and advise the client to avoid the area, and the large buffer zone that we associate with it. You also tend to pick-axe in natural layers, so it ends up being more similar to summer archaeology than one would think. Once fieldwork is done, the soil is brought back in numbered bags (which correspond to a numbered site diagram) to be defrosted over several days. Once dried and defrosted the soil is sieved by hand through screens. If an artifact is recovered (generally only flakes) then we know exactly what test pit it came from and from which test area! Testing is different than excavation because we are using a grid method to just sample an area. We are trying to establish if there is a site, without destroying the site, and the information associated. It’s not about stratigraphy but rather about the location in general. The good news is that if a clovis point were to pop out (highly irregular) we would SEE it in the field. If further information is required we do excavate in long trenches. Either the excavation is done by building excavation tents and using large industrial heaters, and heat blankets OR we wait until the thaw, and excavate in better weather. Unfortunately, we can’t avoid winter testing, because the government regulates archaeology. My first winter, I was afraid that we might saw through an artifact, but no one I’ve ever met has done that. You can always feel when you hit a rock and usually stop to check it out. But, at least in Canada, before doing ANY development you have to call us in. That’s a huge plus in my opinion, unlike a lot of other countries. It’s not a perfect system, but at least there is a system. I hope that answers some questions people might have! I think I made a vlog about winter testing a while back but if there’s a lot of interest I can always record a “how to” for Canadian winter testing.
ruralarchaeologist:

An ulu (ᐅᓗ) on the beach. 
Uluit are the traditional women’s knives of the Yup’ik, Inuit and Aleut women. They are amazing because they’ve been used for thousands of years (including up to the present) and because they are utilized in a variety of tasks. They are basically a woman’s swiss army knife! This particular ulu is made of ground slate and was discovered while beach combing, and must have been dislodged by eroding, river-side archaeological sites.
© ruralarchaeologist 2014

ruralarchaeologist:

An ulu (ᐅᓗ) on the beach.

Uluit are the traditional women’s knives of the Yup’ik, Inuit and Aleut women. They are amazing because they’ve been used for thousands of years (including up to the present) and because they are utilized in a variety of tasks. They are basically a woman’s swiss army knife! This particular ulu is made of ground slate and was discovered while beach combing, and must have been dislodged by eroding, river-side archaeological sites.

© ruralarchaeologist 2014

(via robyn-la)

did-you-kno:

Save Our Skulls is a campaign that asks for sponsors to donate $200 to “Adopt a Skull” in order to help preserve those on display at Philadelphia’s Mutter Museum. Source

did-you-kno:

Save Our Skulls is a campaign that asks for sponsors to donate $200 to “Adopt a Skull” in order to help preserve those on display at Philadelphia’s Mutter Museum. Source

(via trexally)

ladypapalade:

medievalpoc:

doublehamburgerjack:

frantzfandom:

deux-zero-deux:

wtf-fun-factss:

Traces of coca and nicotine found in Egyptian mummies - WTF fun facts

well DUH. a lot of historians are still trying to process the fact that ancient egyptians knew how to build boats, which is ridiculous. why would they not be seafarers and explorers?

this is not new or surprising information at all. it pretty much day one of any african-american studies course.
the egyptians knew that if they put their boats in front of the summer storm winds it’d blow them right across the sea to the Americas and they shared that with the greeks.

It’s really hard for people to understand that everyone had boats, exploration, and trade interactions without the same level of murder, colonization, and violence that the Europeans did. It’s really hard for people to get that.

An 11,000 year old Iroqious boat.
A whole book about Ancient Egyptian Maritime technology and culture.
Scientists “shocked” to discover that humanity casually traveled the seas over 100,000 years ago.
The Sea-Craft of Prehistory (book; Eurocentric as heck)
Humans traveling long distances by sea and deep=sea fishing for c. 42,000 years
The Dufuna Canoe, Africa’s oldest surviving boat, is 8,000 years old (Nigeria)
A fleet of 5,000-year-old boats in Abydos, Egypt
7,000-year-old seaworthy vessels in Kuwait
7,500-year-old boat found in China’s Zhejiang Province. 
Scientific Evidence for Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Voyages (273 pages-for the hardcore only!):

The only plausible explanation for these findings is that a considerable number of transoceanic voyages in both directions across both major oceans were completed between the 7th millennium BC and the European age of discovery. Our growing knowledge of early maritime technology and its accomplishments gives us confidence that vessels and nautical skills capable of these long-distance travels were developed by the times indicated. These voyages put a new complexion on the extensive Old World/New World cultural parallels that have long been controversial.


Can we discuss the fact that they apparently travelled that great dangerous distance TO GET HIGH.

ladypapalade:

medievalpoc:

doublehamburgerjack:

frantzfandom:

deux-zero-deux:

wtf-fun-factss:

Traces of coca and nicotine found in Egyptian mummies - WTF fun facts

well DUH. a lot of historians are still trying to process the fact that ancient egyptians knew how to build boats, which is ridiculous. why would they not be seafarers and explorers?

this is not new or surprising information at all. it pretty much day one of any african-american studies course.

the egyptians knew that if they put their boats in front of the summer storm winds it’d blow them right across the sea to the Americas and they shared that with the greeks.

It’s really hard for people to understand that everyone had boats, exploration, and trade interactions without the same level of murder, colonization, and violence that the Europeans did. It’s really hard for people to get that.

An 11,000 year old Iroqious boat.

A whole book about Ancient Egyptian Maritime technology and culture.

Scientists “shocked” to discover that humanity casually traveled the seas over 100,000 years ago.

The Sea-Craft of Prehistory (book; Eurocentric as heck)

Humans traveling long distances by sea and deep=sea fishing for c. 42,000 years

The Dufuna Canoe, Africa’s oldest surviving boat, is 8,000 years old (Nigeria)

A fleet of 5,000-year-old boats in Abydos, Egypt

7,000-year-old seaworthy vessels in Kuwait

7,500-year-old boat found in China’s Zhejiang Province.

Scientific Evidence for Pre-Columbian Transoceanic Voyages (273 pages-for the hardcore only!):

The only plausible explanation for these findings is that a considerable number of transoceanic voyages in both directions across both major oceans were completed between the 7th millennium BC and the European age of discovery. Our growing knowledge of early maritime technology and its accomplishments gives us confidence that vessels and nautical skills capable of these long-distance travels were developed by the times indicated. These voyages put a new complexion on the extensive Old World/New World cultural parallels that have long been controversial.

Can we discuss the fact that they apparently travelled that great dangerous distance TO GET HIGH.

(via thelunaticyouarelookingfor)

thecuckoohaslanded:

earthlydreams:

feminismisatrick:

misanthrpologie:

Saving Face (2012), acid attacks on women in Pakistan

Meanwhile, in America, feminists are complaining about how dress codes are oppressive.

You idiots have never experienced oppression, and pray you never do, because this is what it looks like.

As a South Asian American feminist, let me remind everyone that oppression is not a competition.

Just because we fight one type of sexism doesn’t mean we don’t care about other instances of sexism that don’t affect us directly in our day to day lives.

My heart goes out to this woman and the hundreds of other victims like her. I want to educate people about these kinds of incidents. I support organizations that help women like this.

You may think that dress code issues are trivial, but they are related to a larger issue of women’s bodily autonomy, which affects women’s health and safety.

So please, let’s try to bring awareness and bring about change instead of insulting entire groups of people because they are facing issues that are less scary than the one presented.

oppression is not a competition

thank you so much for this wording

(via trexally)

chiefbreadbear:

This is fucking fantastic. This is a newspaper article from 2004 revealling that the man who discovered DNA, Francis crick used LSD frequently and was high when he made his discovery. Saying he frequently used LSD as a ‘thinking tool’ to boost his mental powers.
And i am in love with this :)

chiefbreadbear:

This is fucking fantastic. This is a newspaper article from 2004 revealling that the man who discovered DNA, Francis crick used LSD frequently and was high when he made his discovery. Saying he frequently used LSD as a ‘thinking tool’ to boost his mental powers.

And i am in love with this :)

(via nhevezi)